Storage Tips

Packing in Boxes

  • Box up everything that you can. Anything left unboxed in a self-storage facility can get dusty.
  • Fill boxes to capacity. The contents in half-empty boxes can shift during transport or lifting. Corners and sides can collapse if there’s nothing to support them. Foam peanuts are handy for filling in the gaps in boxes.
  • Distribute the weight in packed boxes evenly. Make sure they are not too heavy for you and others who may be lifting them.
  • Wrap all fragile items and breakables such as dishes, glasses, ornaments, etc. separately. Pack these items tightly into strong or reinforced boxes, filling any gaps with paper or filler. Mark “Fragile” on any boxes containing breakable items.
  • Clearly label all boxes on more than one side so you can easily identify the contents.
  • Pack books flat to avoid damaging their spines.

Be creative

  • You can use virtually all of the space in and around your stored furniture, including other items, as places to store more items. Fill anything that's hollow with items to maximize your available space:
  • Furniture drawers are good for storing fragile items
  • Stack the shelves of bookcases with books, small boxes and other odds and ends
  • Store boxes containing fragile goods inside of wardrobes
  • Store pillows, blankets and other bedding inside washers and dryers
  • Store clothes inside dresser drawers
Helpful Hints
  • Use furniture drawers to hold delicate items. Wrap them in bubble wrap or newspaper.
  • When packing toys or smaller objects, remember to fill boxes completely, stuffing open areas with plain newspaper to prevent collapsing when stacked.
  • Be careful not to store anything combustible (such as paint and chemicals) or perishable (such as food that is not permanently sealed).
  • When storing lawn and garden equipment, drain any fluids prior to storage in order to avoid corrosive damage.
  • Use trash cans to store shovels, hoes and rakes.
  • Always use high quality locks on your unit. Granny's sells locks on-site; ask the Store Manager for details.
  • When storing delicate heirlooms, use specially constructed boxes, such as wardrobe boxes, and utilize dehumidifiers to prevent mildew build up.
  • Store furniture carefully on boards or pallets.
  • Cover mattresses and store them flat on level surfaces.
  • Store small items like pots and pans in large appliances, such as stoves or refrigerators.
  • Break down items (such as table legs) and store large furniture (like tabletops and sofas) on end to save space.
  • Use protective covers and treat wood surfaces before storing.
  • When storing business files, label all boxes and construct aisles so files are easily seen and accessible.
  • Clean furniture, boxes and the storage unit of all food and perishables.
Insuring Your Stored Items

You may think that successful self-storage means your extra stuff is out of sight, out of mind. But it’s just as easy to overlook insuring your prized possessions when they’re stored remotely. In most cases, your homeowner’s or renter’s insurance policy may offer some coverage for the contents of a storage unit. Most items commonly stored are covered under self-storage insurance policies, one exception is vehicles. Most require stored vehicles to be covered by an auto insurance policy. You will need to provide proof of this coverage when you sign your storage rental lease. Review a tenant insurance policy to find details about what is covered and what is excluded from coverage.

Whether you are planning to store your personal belongings or items for your business, make sure to calculate how much you estimate your items are worth. That way, you can purchase the appropriate amount of insurance and have peace of mind that your belongings are covered.